Reviews

When music paints pictures

The chamber orchestra and four soloists of the 'Musical Summer', under the guidance of 

Viennese conductor Wolfgang Doerner, chose for the first part of their program Vivaldi's 

famous and much taxed, yet ingenious, violin concerto "La Quattro Stagioni" (The four 

seasons). Those who thought these pieces had been fully interpreted were easily proven 

wrong. Ensemble and soloists interpreted Vivaldi's baroque programmatic-music (each of 

the concertos relates to a "Sonetto Dimonstrativo" of the composer) literally, as was usual 

for that time regarding word-based music. Drastically painted, but not overdrawn, scenes 

dominated, with the amazing coordination of all members contributing to their power and 

atmosphere. While they were playing in unison watching the interplay between ensemble 

and soli was breathtaking. In the interpretation of the solo voices - Mechthild Karkow in the 

concerto 'Spring', Franziska Koenig ('Summer'), Doren Dinglinger ('Autumn'), and the 

Korean Se-Young Kim ('Winter') - the differences of the artists' characters, the access each 

had to the music, their technical virtuosity and a spontaneity born out of an intimate 

understanding of the music fascinated the audience. 

Caption: Se-Young Kim captivated as Winter Fairy in a white dress.

Delightful cembalo movements with magical Tutti-accompaniment in 'Adagio' were 

accomplished persuasively. Joyful, in a strongly accentuated processional dance, autumn 

wants to merge into winter, interrupted only briefly by rearing figures and an eerie Tutti- 

tremolo. Icily winter comes closer. The orchestra achieves this effect through hard, crystal 

clear miniatures. As a soloist Se-Young Kim shines in an allegorical white dress. This young 

artist, she studies with Professor Wolfram Koenig in Trossingen, delights with her 

wonderful, dynamic play and with her urge towards great virtuosity. Kim the Winter Fairy 

conjures an incomparably beautiful, soft, downy blanket over the land. Then, all of a 

sudden, winter is powerfully present. A grandiose performance by the four soloists and the 

entire orchestra is celebrated with exultant cheers.

Bach, Brahms and Berg

 (Friday, May 14, 2004)

Passionately the first movement surges forward, yet always with a hint of melancholy. In 

the scherzo Brahms finally shows himself as truly happy and the three musicians, Se-Young 

Kim, violin, Jill Hesse, horn, and Laura Rigby-Stokes, Piano, vehemently let this be known. 

The adagio floats between sadness and bliss with a fierce outburst in between, but the 

final movement urges into the wide open with impassioned triplets. 

University music students participate in famous competition

(Trossinger Zeitung, January 15, 2007)

In anticipation of the Mendelssohn-Competition in Berlin the Trossinger students Se-Young 

Kim (Violin) and Katalin Rozgonyi (Piano) have extensively rehearsed four violin sonatas by 

Beethoven, a fantasy by Arnold Schoenberg and pieces by Debussy and Brahms, as well as, 

of course, Mendelssohn-Bartholdy. It was especially in the works from the romantic period 

that the violinist Se-Young Kim revealed a profound dedication that combined congenially 

with the lithe and supple piano melodies. Debussy sounded distinctly cooler; Schoenberg 

somewhat distant, which suited the complex structures of his works well. 

Quintet inspires again and again.

 (Trossinger Zeitung, Friday, January 28, 2005)

Although in a fit of youthful exuberance Ionnna Poenaru hit the keys of her piano slightly 

too hard at times, the audience immediately realized that the five university students 

playing in front of them were real artists. Se-Young Kim is an excellent violinist and playing 

in concert with the cellist Maraike Kirchner, who plays equally as tunefully as Kim, both 

carried the melody in a congenial manner. The violist Sandor Varga elegantly provided the 

accompanying figures and Ovidiu Lucian-Manolache, with his contrabass, set the 

foundation on solid footing. Following an almost tragic introduction, a happy musical 

performance ensued, characterized by dancing aspiration. It was especially beautiful how 

the horn section seemed to 'speak' with the string players. Schubert's touching melodics 

seem to pull one's soul from one's body. It is heavenly music that came right out of 

Schubert's heart. A happy Allegro, as well as an Andante with seven variations, of which the 

final one was purely a violin concerto, followed. 

Matinee in Townhall's Foyer well visited

 (Thursday, February 19, 2004)

The selection of contemporary music from the 20th century was intoned by both artists 

magnificently. The lively alternation between dramatic dissonances and cheery, playful 

harmonics was worked out brilliantly, in the solo pieces, as well as the duets. 

Modern Sounds in the Townhall

With their virtuoso performance both artists quickly spellbound their audience. That Maria 

Se-Young Kim chose as her first piece Yossi Gutmann's Sonata for Violin, a piece in which 

two motifs are introduced and in the course of the piece combined with one another, must 

have been especially poignant for Christopher Link, as it was Gutmann who inspired him 

as a teacher at the Conservatory in Eisenstadt. The temperamental performance of the 

Korean artist gratified the audience greatly.

Successful Matinee in the Townhall's Foyer

The young artist Maria Se-Young Kim has already performed with the Seoul Symphonic 

Orchestra as soloist. She impressed her audience in Steisslingen with the Sonata Nr. 3 in C- 

Dur by Johann Sebastian Bach. Caption: "Musical Sunday" - A very successful musical 

Sunday morning was prepared by Maria Se-Young Kim (Violin) and Christoph Link (Viola) 

for the audience of the matinee in the foyer of the Steissling townhall. They delighted 

visitors with their virtuoso performance of works by Niccolo Paganini, Aram 

Chatschaturian, Johann Sebastian Bach and Adolf Busch. It was especially gratifying to see 

the number of young concert goers this year attending the opening of the Musical Spring, 

an event now in its seventh year. 

Successful Matinee in Townhall/Musicians Enchant Audience

In the passage by Heinrich Biber a baroque richness of sound was assembled in a theme 

of four declining notes, a theme which repeatedly unified the competing ideas and merged 

them peacefully together. Maria Se-Young Kim let her performance become an auditory 

feast. Following their performance in the Steisslingen townhall, both artists received 

veritable storms of long lasting applause by the enchanted audience. 

Masterpieces from Three Centuries (Süd-Kurier)

Playing "Passacaglia" for violin solo, composed by Bohemian violinist Heinrich Ignaz Biber 

(1644 - 1704), Maria Se-Young Kim captivated her audience and took them on a stellar 

musical journey. The young violinist has already completed her graduate degree in music 

and is currently working on her education as a soloist at the College of Music at the 

university in Trossingen. She comes across as a very warm and natural individual and her 

musical interpretation mirrors her personality. Her sound has substance and was able to 

fill the acoustic space of the church even when she was playing the most delicate 

Pianissimo. The "Passacaglia," often used as the concluding piece of a suite, is a musical 

piece made up of variations of a constantly repeating base line in triple meter. Se-Young 

Kim played this baroque masterpiece with a surprisingly large variety of moods and 

timbres, with a fine sense for acoustic nuances and an immense intensity of expression 

from the first to the last tone. The Adagio-like, prelude of heavenly sweetness played in a 

sacred tune, attained contours and a sudden unexpected bite. Mozart, played in a 

transparent and spirited manner by the charismatic violin virtuoso Se-Young Kim, made up 

the wonderfully relaxing finale. Kim took the lead in a sensitive and low-key manner 

without ever dominating her musical partner. "It was simply fantastic," was the comment 

most often heard from concert goers following the end. 

Pure Passion in Wiegoldsbur: Chambermusic in Wibaldi Church

(Rheiderland Zeitung, July 30, 2003)

The highlight of the concert was the piece Piano trio g-moll op. 15 by the famous Czech 

composer Friedrich Smetana. It was pure passion, acoustically and optically. The Korean 

Se-Young Kim (violin) not only imparts the sounds of her violin strength and life, she 

herself becomes music! Peter Barcaba, playing the piano, and Christoph Otto Beyer (violin- 

cello) also showed much emotion. All three artists play with unbelievable physical effort 

and create musical and artistic eruptions that inspire and electrify. These artists offer the 

unusual, they interpret Smetana in the best manner, let their music appear transparent 

and paint beautiful themes in Wibaldi Church, from airy, delightful dance scenes to 

monumental bodies of sound. The consummation of their tremendous effort comes in the 

vehement ending. For their grandiose performance the trio receives storms of applause by 

the audience. 

Perfection from beginning to end: Musical Summer in the Bagbander Church

(Ostfriesen-Zeitung, August 9, 2001)

Then the sole male musician of the evening took his place in front of the piano. Seong- 

Soon Hwang together with violinist Se-Young Kim played the well known B-major-sonata by 

Mozart, which, while well known for its difficulty, posed no problems at all for either 

musician. Kim played so clearly, so expressively, so congenially that listeners did not notice 

what a challenge this piece is to play. While the "Seufzerfiguren" (sigh figures) of the violin 

were somewhat exaggerated at times, the talents and skills of the Korean artists, combined 

with the clarity and nobility of their playing, led to a beautifully organized set of dialogically 

patterned themes. Played by Se-Young Kim and Amalia-Maria Bonciocat on the piano, the 

outer movements of the Brahms-sonata bore witness to a passionate creative force.

The Fireworks of Chamber music

(Ostfriesen-Zeitung, August 7, 2003) Magical sounds by Doren Dinglinger, Se-Young Kim and Yuan Rong (all violin), as well as the petit Hyun-Ju Yu (piano) provided the crowning finale of a very varied program. Se-Young Kim and Hyun-Ju Yu enchanted their audience with two outstandingly intense sonatas, one by Ludwig van Beethoven and the other by Claude Debussy.

The Fireworks of Chamber Music in Aurich

(Ostfriesische Nachrichten, August, 7, 2003) Se-Young Kim and Hyun-Ju Yu enchanted their audience with two outstandingly intense sonatas, one by Ludwig van Beethoven and the other by Claude Debussy. Kim's distinctive emotion and vehemence, but also her mellifluous play, are very promising. Kim is an artist that in the future will no doubt have a striking impact on the musical scene.

no title

[Se-Young Kim] shone thanks to a very expressive, yet playful, rendition of Claude Debussy's "Sonata for Violin and Piano g-minor." Kim, who is from South Korea, left the strongest impression of the evening, especially in regards to stage presence. She captured the essence of Ludwig van Beethoven's "Sonata for Piano and Violin op 12 Nr. 1 D-major" and was able to interpret the piece in a confident and personable manner.

Brilliant Musicians rouse Heart and Soul

(Schwarzwaelder Bote, Thursday, March 15, 2004) "It is quite strenuous to watch so much brilliance," exclaimed one audience member at the end of her concert experience at Culture & Clinic on Sunday evening. A captivating evening of chamber music in the chapel of the county clinic enthralled music lovers. The young, award-winning violinist Se-Young Kim and the pianist Juliane Wagner, lecturer at the Trossinger College of Music, played sonatas from four eras. Dr. Albrecht Dapp, the initiator of the concert series, was especially happy with the patient turn-out, because patients need more than medicine; they also require something for heart and soul. With Mozart's late B-major Sonata KV 454 a compositional miracle was brought to flower. Kim, supported by the accomplished pianist, led listeners into the abyss of the minors and brought both instruments back together in the gentle reprise. The first contrast followed with the great French impressionist Claude Debussy. Instead of long Mozart-like melodies, there were now short motifs and structures that the violin allowed to echo, sporadically die out and reappear in the form of varied forms. The piano enriched with its sounds the fountain of inspiration. It was, for the listener, as well as the spectator, affectingly beautiful, not just to hear, but to see with what fervor the young Se-Young Kim elicited from her violin abrupt shreds of sound and crystal clear flageolet tones with such seemingly fragile fingers. The absolute highlight was, of course, Jussi Gutmann's "Sonata for Solo Violin." Here the audience experienced a true emotional roller-coaster between the wild, perfect dissonances and softly dying harmonies that the young violinist produced with expressions of pain. As a welcome final act of romantic-harmonic reconciliation came the piece by Brahms. The "Sonata for Piano and Violin in G-major Opus 78" allowed both ladies to show off their abilities to their fullest extent one last time.

Romantic-harmonic reconciliation with Violin and Piano

"It is quite strenuous to watch so much brilliance," exclaimed one audience member at the end of her concert experience at Culture & Clinic on Sunday evening. The multi-award winning violinist Se-Young Kim and the pianist Juliane Wagner, lecturer at the Trossinger College of Music, played sonatas from four eras. With Mozart's late B-major Sonata KV 454 a compositional miracle was brought to flower. Kim, supported by the accomplished pianist, led listeners into the abyss of the minors and brought both instruments back together in the gentle reprise. In the brilliant final-rondo, with its boisterous abundance of ideas, both artists were allowed "to let of some steam" for the first time. The first contrast followed with the great French impressionist Claude Debussy. Instead of long Mozart-like melodies, there were now short motifs and structures that the violin allowed to echo, sporadically die out and reappear in the form of varied forms. The piano enriched with its sounds the fountain of inspiration. Strikingly beautiful It was, for the listener, as well as the spectator, strikingly beautiful, not just to hear, but to see with what fervor the young Se- Young Kim elicited from her violin abrupt shreds of sound and crystal clear flageolet tones with such seemingly fragile fingers. The absolute highlight was, of course, Jussi Gutmann's "Sonata for Solo Violin." For Kim interpreting this recent, yet well-known piece was particularly poignant, as her current teacher, Professor Wolfram Koenig, premiered it a few years prior. Here the audience experienced a true emotional roller-coaster between the wild, perfect dissonances, that hurt one's ears, and softly dying harmonies which the young violinist produced with expressions of pain.

Soaring artistic talent: Brilliant Final Concert of the Musical Summer in Reepsholt

(Anzeiger fuer Harlingerland, August 12, 2003) The most popular recital was by Se-Young Kim, whose brilliant play developed and continued to build into an unleashed passion. Absolutely outstanding her performance; spontaneous the audience reaction - waves of applause. These "Four Seasons" made accessible to the audience a particular manner of presentation in which Vivaldi takes an exceptional position
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Reviews

Reviews

When music paints

pictures

The chamber orchestra and four soloists of the 

'Musical Summer', under the guidance of 

Viennese conductor Wolfgang Doerner, chose 

for the first part of their program Vivaldi's 

famous and much taxed, yet ingenious, violin 

concerto "La Quattro Stagioni" (The four 

seasons). Those who thought these pieces had 

been fully interpreted were easily proven wrong. 

Ensemble and soloists interpreted Vivaldi's 

baroque programmatic-music (each of the 

concertos relates to a "Sonetto Dimonstrativo" 

of the composer) literally, as was usual for that 

time regarding word-based music. Drastically 

painted, but not overdrawn, scenes dominated, 

with the amazing coordination of all members 

contributing to their power and atmosphere. 

While they were playing in unison watching the 

interplay between ensemble and soli was 

breathtaking. In the interpretation of the solo 

voices - Mechthild Karkow in the concerto 

'Spring', Franziska Koenig ('Summer'), Doren 

Dinglinger ('Autumn'), and the Korean Se-Young 

Kim ('Winter') - the differences of the artists' 

characters, the access each had to the music, 

their technical virtuosity and a spontaneity born 

out of an intimate understanding of the music 

fascinated the audience.

Caption: Se-Young Kim captivated as

Winter Fairy in a white dress.

Delightful cembalo movements with magical 

Tutti-accompaniment in 'Adagio' were 

accomplished persuasively. Joyful, in a strongly 

accentuated processional dance, autumn wants 

to merge into winter, interrupted only briefly by 

rearing figures and an eerie Tutti-tremolo. Icily 

winter comes closer. The orchestra achieves this 

effect through hard, crystal clear miniatures. As 

a soloist Se-Young Kim shines in an allegorical 

white dress. This young artist, she studies with 

Professor Wolfram Koenig in Trossingen, 

delights with her wonderful, dynamic play and 

with her urge towards great virtuosity. Kim the 

Winter Fairy conjures an incomparably beautiful, 

soft, downy blanket over the land. Then, all of a 

sudden, winter is powerfully present. A 

grandiose performance by the four soloists and 

the entire orchestra is celebrated with exultant 

cheers.

Bach, Brahms and

Berg

 (Friday, May 14, 2004)

Passionately the first movement surges forward, 

yet always with a hint of melancholy. In the 

scherzo Brahms finally shows himself as truly 

happy and the three musicians, Se-Young Kim, 

violin, Jill Hesse, horn, and Laura Rigby-Stokes, 

Piano, vehemently let this be known. The adagio 

floats between sadness and bliss with a fierce 

outburst in between, but the final movement 

urges into the wide open with impassioned 

triplets.

University music students

participate in famous

competition

(Trossinger Zeitung, January 15, 2007)

In anticipation of the Mendelssohn-Competition 

in Berlin the Trossinger students Se-Young Kim 

(Violin) and Katalin Rozgonyi (Piano) have 

extensively rehearsed four violin sonatas by 

Beethoven, a fantasy by Arnold Schoenberg and 

pieces by Debussy and Brahms, as well as, of 

course, Mendelssohn-Bartholdy. It was 

especially in the works from the romantic period 

that the violinist Se-Young Kim revealed a 

profound dedication that combined congenially 

with the lithe and supple piano melodies. 

Debussy sounded distinctly cooler; Schoenberg 

somewhat distant, which suited the complex 

structures of his works well. 

Quintet inspires

again and again.

 (Trossinger Zeitung, Friday, January 28, 2005)

Although in a fit of youthful exuberance Ionnna 

Poenaru hit the keys of her piano slightly too 

hard at times, the audience immediately realized 

that the five university students playing in front 

of them were real artists. Se-Young Kim is an 

excellent violinist and playing in concert with the 

cellist Maraike Kirchner, who plays equally as 

tunefully as Kim, both carried the melody in a 

congenial manner. The violist Sandor Varga 

elegantly provided the accompanying figures 

and Ovidiu Lucian-Manolache, with his 

contrabass, set the foundation on solid footing. 

Following an almost tragic introduction, a happy 

musical performance ensued, characterized by 

dancing aspiration. It was especially beautiful 

how the horn section seemed to 'speak' with the 

string players. Schubert's touching melodics 

seem to pull one's soul from one's body. It is 

heavenly music that came right out of Schubert's 

heart. A happy Allegro, as well as an Andante 

with seven variations, of which the final one was 

purely a violin concerto, followed. 

Matinee in

Townhall's Foyer

well visited

 (Thursday, February 19, 2004)

The selection of contemporary music from the 

20th century was intoned by both artists 

magnificently. The lively alternation between 

dramatic dissonances and cheery, playful 

harmonics was worked out brilliantly, in the solo 

pieces, as well as the duets.

Modern Sounds in the

Townhall

With their virtuoso performance both artists 

quickly spellbound their audience. That Maria 

Se-Young Kim chose as her first piece Yossi 

Gutmann's Sonata for Violin, a piece in which 

two motifs are introduced and in the course of 

the piece combined with one another, must 

have been especially poignant for Christopher 

Link, as it was Gutmann who inspired him as a 

teacher at the Conservatory in Eisenstadt. The 

temperamental performance of the Korean 

artist gratified the audience greatly.

Successful Matinee in

the Townhall's Foyer

The young artist Maria Se-Young Kim has already

performed with the Seoul Symphonic Orchestra 

as soloist. She impressed her audience in 

Steisslingen with the Sonata Nr. 3 in C-Dur by 

Johann Sebastian Bach. Caption: "Musical 

Sunday" - A very successful musical Sunday 

morning was prepared by Maria Se-Young Kim 

(Violin) and Christoph Link (Viola) for the 

audience of the matinee in the foyer of the 

Steissling townhall. They delighted visitors with 

their virtuoso performance of works by Niccolo 

Paganini, Aram Chatschaturian, Johann 

Sebastian Bach and Adolf Busch. It was 

especially gratifying to see the number of young 

concert goers this year attending the opening of 

the Musical Spring, an event now in its seventh 

year.

Successful Matinee in

Townhall/Musicians Enchant

Audience

In the passage by Heinrich Biber a baroque 

richness of sound was assembled in a theme of 

four declining notes, a theme which repeatedly 

unified the competing ideas and merged them 

peacefully together. Maria Se-Young Kim let her 

performance become an auditory feast. 

Following their performance in the Steisslingen 

townhall, both artists received veritable storms 

of long lasting applause by the enchanted 

audience.

Masterpieces from

Three Centuries (Süd-

Kurier)

Playing "Passacaglia" for violin solo, composed 

by Bohemian violinist Heinrich Ignaz Biber (1644 

- 1704), Maria Se-Young Kim captivated her 

audience and took them on a stellar musical 

journey. The young violinist has already 

completed her graduate degree in music and is 

currently working on her education as a soloist 

at the College of Music at the university in 

Trossingen. She comes across as a very warm 

and natural individual and her musical 

interpretation mirrors her personality. Her 

sound has substance and was able to fill the 

acoustic space of the church even when she was 

playing the most delicate Pianissimo. The 

"Passacaglia," often used as the concluding 

piece of a suite, is a musical piece made up of 

variations of a constantly repeating base line in 

triple meter. Se-Young Kim played this baroque 

masterpiece with a surprisingly large variety of 

moods and timbres, with a fine sense for 

acoustic nuances and an immense intensity of 

expression from the first to the last tone. The 

Adagio-like, prelude of heavenly sweetness 

played in a sacred tune, attained contours and a 

sudden unexpected bite. Mozart, played in a 

transparent and spirited manner by the 

charismatic violin virtuoso Se-Young Kim, made 

up the wonderfully relaxing finale. Kim took the 

lead in a sensitive and low-key manner without 

ever dominating her musical partner. "It was 

simply fantastic," was the comment most often 

heard from concert goers following the end. 

Pure Passion in Wiegoldsbur:

Chambermusic in Wibaldi Church

(Rheiderland Zeitung, July 30, 2003)

The highlight of the concert was the piece Piano 

trio g-moll op. 15 by the famous Czech 

composer Friedrich Smetana. It was pure 

passion, acoustically and optically. The Korean 

Se-Young Kim (violin) not only imparts the 

sounds of her violin strength and life, she herself 

becomes music! Peter Barcaba, playing the 

piano, and Christoph Otto Beyer (violin-cello) 

also showed much emotion. All three artists play 

with unbelievable physical effort and create 

musical and artistic eruptions that inspire and 

electrify. These artists offer the unusual, they 

interpret Smetana in the best manner, let their 

music appear transparent and paint beautiful 

themes in Wibaldi Church, from airy, delightful 

dance scenes to monumental bodies of sound. 

The consummation of their tremendous effort 

comes in the vehement ending. For their 

grandiose performance the trio receives storms 

of applause by the audience. 

Perfection from beginning to end: Musical

Summer in the Bagbander Church

(Ostfriesen-Zeitung, August 9, 2001)

Then the sole male musician of the evening took 

his place in front of the piano. Seong-Soon 

Hwang together with violinist Se-Young Kim 

played the well known B-major-sonata by 

Mozart, which, while well known for its difficulty, 

posed no problems at all for either musician. 

Kim played so clearly, so expressively, so 

congenially that listeners did not notice what a 

challenge this piece is to play. While the 

"Seufzerfiguren" (sigh figures) of the violin were 

somewhat exaggerated at times, the talents and 

skills of the Korean artists, combined with the 

clarity and nobility of their playing, led to a 

beautifully organized set of dialogically 

patterned themes. Played by Se-Young Kim and 

Amalia-Maria Bonciocat on the piano, the outer 

movements of the Brahms-sonata bore witness 

to a passionate creative force.

The Fireworks of

Chamber music

(Ostfriesen-Zeitung, August 7, 2003) Magical sounds by Doren Dinglinger, Se-Young Kim and Yuan Rong (all violin), as well as the petit Hyun-Ju Yu (piano) provided the crowning finale of a very varied program. Se-Young Kim and Hyun-Ju Yu enchanted their audience with two outstandingly intense sonatas, one by Ludwig van Beethoven and the other by Claude Debussy.

The Fireworks of

Chamber Music in

Aurich

(Ostfriesische Nachrichten, August, 7,  2003) Se-Young Kim and Hyun-Ju Yu  enchanted their audience with two  outstandingly intense sonatas, one by  Ludwig van Beethoven and the other by  Claude Debussy. Kim's distinctive  emotion and vehemence, but also her  mellifluous play, are very promising. Kim is an artist that in the future will no doubt have a striking impact on the musical  scene.

no title

[Se-Young Kim] shone thanks to a very  expressive, yet playful, rendition of  Claude Debussy's "Sonata for Violin and  Piano g-minor." Kim, who is from South  Korea, left the strongest impression of  the evening, especially in regards to stage presence. She captured the essence of  Ludwig van Beethoven's "Sonata for  Piano and Violin op 12 Nr. 1 D-major" and was able to interpret the piece in a  confident and personable manner.

Brilliant Musicians

rouse Heart and Soul

(Schwarzwaelder Bote, Thursday, March 15,  2004) "It is quite strenuous to watch so much  brilliance," exclaimed one audience member at  the end of her concert experience at Culture &  Clinic on Sunday evening. A captivating evening  of chamber music in the chapel of the county  clinic enthralled music lovers. The young, award-  winning violinist Se-Young Kim and the pianist  Juliane Wagner, lecturer at the Trossinger  College of Music, played sonatas from four eras.  Dr. Albrecht Dapp, the initiator of the concert  series, was especially happy with the patient  turn-out, because patients need more than  medicine; they also require something for heart  and soul. With Mozart's late B-major Sonata KV  454 a compositional miracle was brought to  flower. Kim, supported by the accomplished  pianist, led listeners into the abyss of the minors  and brought both instruments back together in  the gentle reprise. The first contrast followed  with the great French impressionist Claude  Debussy. Instead of long Mozart-like melodies,  there were now short motifs and structures that  the violin allowed to echo, sporadically die out  and reappear in the form of varied forms. The  piano enriched with its sounds the fountain of  inspiration. It was, for the listener, as well as the  spectator, affectingly beautiful, not just to hear,  but to see with what fervor the young Se-Young  Kim elicited from her violin abrupt shreds of  sound and crystal clear flageolet tones with such  seemingly fragile fingers. The absolute highlight  was, of course, Jussi Gutmann's "Sonata for Solo  Violin." Here the audience experienced a true  emotional roller-coaster between the wild,  perfect dissonances and softly dying harmonies  that the young violinist produced with  expressions of pain. As a welcome final act of  romantic-harmonic reconciliation came the  piece by Brahms. The "Sonata for Piano and  Violin in G-major Opus 78" allowed both ladies  to show off their abilities to their fullest extent  one last time. 

Romantic-harmonic

reconciliation with Violin and

Piano

"It is quite strenuous to watch so much  brilliance," exclaimed one audience member at  the end of her concert experience at Culture &  Clinic on Sunday evening. The multi-award  winning violinist Se-Young Kim and the pianist  Juliane Wagner, lecturer at the Trossinger  College of Music, played sonatas from four eras.  With Mozart's late B-major Sonata KV 454 a  compositional miracle was brought to flower.  Kim, supported by the accomplished pianist, led  listeners into the abyss of the minors and  brought both instruments back together in the  gentle reprise. In the brilliant final-rondo, with its  boisterous abundance of ideas, both artists  were allowed "to let of some steam" for the first  time. The first contrast followed with the great  French impressionist Claude Debussy. Instead of  long Mozart-like melodies, there were now short  motifs and structures that the violin allowed to  echo, sporadically die out and reappear in the  form of varied forms. The piano enriched with  its sounds the fountain of inspiration. Strikingly  beautiful It was, for the listener, as well as the  spectator, strikingly beautiful, not just to hear,  but to see with what fervor the young Se-Young  Kim elicited from her violin abrupt shreds of  sound and crystal clear flageolet tones with such  seemingly fragile fingers. The absolute highlight  was, of course, Jussi Gutmann's "Sonata for Solo  Violin." For Kim interpreting this recent, yet well-  known piece was particularly poignant, as her  current teacher, Professor Wolfram Koenig,  premiered it a few years prior. Here the  audience experienced a true emotional roller-  coaster between the wild, perfect dissonances,  that hurt one's ears, and softly dying harmonies  which the young violinist produced with  expressions of pain. 

Soaring artistic talent: Brilliant Final Concert

of the Musical Summer in Reepsholt

(Anzeiger fuer Harlingerland, August 12, 2003)  The most popular recital was by Se-Young Kim,  whose brilliant play developed and continued to  build into an unleashed passion. Absolutely  outstanding her performance; spontaneous the  audience reaction - waves of applause. These  "Four Seasons" made accessible to the audience  a particular manner of presentation in which  Vivaldi takes an exceptional position  
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SeYoung Maria Kim
Violin